What is the Internet of Things and How Does it Compromise Security

Future Security

Your car can call for an ambulance; your refrigerator can remind you to buy milk, and you watch can keep track of when you sleep. The technology that connects all of these physical devices is known as the Internet of Things (IOT). And while your clients are excited about connecting their watch to their home security system, you and your sales team need to be aware of how the IOT can compromise security. At National Monitoring Center (NMC) we know that technology frequently outpaces everyday knowledge. We can help you and your sales team stay ahead of the problems that arise when your clients starting using technology that can undermine your work to keep them safe.

 

Memory chips and processing boards are getting smaller and smaller. There is more computing power on an iPhone than in the first space shuttle. And as technology gets smaller and smaller, more and more devices can carry computing power. Unfortunately, as everyday object gain complex technology, they are become susceptible to hackers.

 

The basic garage door opener is a classic example of how personal safety is often at the mercy of technology. You already know that the modern garage door opener needs to have revolving frequencies to avoid thieves from copying the signal to gain access to the house. The same rules now apply to any item on the Internet of Things. Because a user can open the front door to his or her house with a smartwatch, the watch needs to be secure or you will find yourself answering phone after a burglary.

 

Physical security and technological security are now inexorably linked. And the dependency they share will become the selling point for the future of security. Contact NMC today to learn how we can help you and your clients gain from the Internet of Things.

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What is the Internet of Things and How Does it Compromise Security
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Physical security and technological security are now inexorably linked. And the dependency they share will become the selling point for the future of security.